I will be super honest here, writing this review might just be the hardest thing I have had to write in a very long time. Not because I Used To Go Here isn’t good, that would have been much easier in all honesty. No, it’s because I Used To Go Here is actually a really good film in the grand scheme of things, but the main problem I had with this is that I found myself bored out of my mind while watching it. I had to watch it twice in order to be able to write this and even on my second viewing I found myself bored and just wanting to do anything else really.

In 2017, Jay Baruchel made his feature directorial debut with Goon: Last of the Enforcers, a sequel to the Michael Dowse helmed Goon, which he co-wrote with Evan Goldberg. The response to his film was that it didn’t sway too much from the original – which makes for an enjoyable sequel but doesn’t try to fix some of the things that critics didn’t enjoy in the first film, such as it’s violence at the scale it had. And it seems that Jay doubled down (or even quadrupled) on the violence for his horror film. And it makes for a great and grimey horror. 

Over the years, films about religion and sexuality have become much more prominent and less taboo. We’ve deepened the examination of sexual repression within the Catholic and Christian church, more specifically in the early 2000s and before then. Although many of the churches have adapted and continue to adapt, there’s no forgetting the repression that queer people and women went through; and many continue to experience within their own religion. 

In our world today, technology and apps have not only allowed us to order rides from complete strangers but also rent someone’s home, room or cottage for the desired time. You just pick a date, show up for the keys and it’s yours for the weekend without ever really knowing exactly who you’re renting from apart from face value. Most people who participate in this system are more than likely comfortable with the idea, myself included; but what if the fear of being watched or recorded without your knowledge was brought to life. In the case of The Rental, that is exactly what’s demonstrated on screen. 

Here’s the thing, I have read the whole Umbrella Academy graphic novel series. It was one of those gems that I found by accident and couldn’t get enough, wishing that more was available and running to the store every time a new book would come out. So going into the first season of the show, I had high expectations. Because I knew how crazy and over the top this graphic novel was, I was scared that a television show would tone it down and make it dull and boring. Well, the exact opposite happened. The show was wild, full of surprises and didn’t feel like the craziness was toned down. It was a show that hit hard and even with its flaws was one of the most enjoyable seasons Netflix had put out. So to say that my expectations for season two were high is an understatement. It had not only to stand up alongside the graphic novel but also the excellent first season. Did they do it? Yes, not only is the second season of Umbrella Academy excellent, but it surpasses every expectation I had set for it.

Let me preface this review by saying that I am an Arthurian legend fanatic. I have read and studied the legend for so long that as soon as the premise for Cursed, I was in. Now, I know this show is based on a graphic novel but I have not read it (yet) and so I came in blind with the hope that I would enjoy it as much as I have enjoyed Arthurian Legend content in the past. The problem? Cursed tries so hard to be so many things that in the end it fails it’s an interesting premise and becomes a mess that drags on and can’t seem to get to the point of its premise.

Brandon Cronenberg made a huge splash with his debut feature Antiviral. One part of it was apart of who his father was, but another part was the fact he made a great debut.

Well he’s finally back, and I’ve been waiting to see this film for a long time. But also, it feels like a long time because 2020 has already felt like it lasted at least 2.5 years.

For a long time now, Netflix has been trying to find what would become its big blockbuster franchise. Over the last few years, we have seen them going out by releasing big-budget action movies like Bright, Triple Frontier, 6 Underground and Extraction just to name a few. While some of then are or will get sequels, none seem to be poised to become Netflix’s franchise that you know they want. After all, summer blockbuster movies are still one of the most lucrative things for Hollywood and when a franchise work, it can prove to go on for a very long time. But when you look at things for Netflix, even with a few viral movies like Birdbox, they just don’t seem to catch the break that they want. Netflix’s most talked-about originals are more often than not their shows or romantic comedies. But with the arrival of The Old Guard, the streaming service might have just found what will be their next big thing. Not only because it is perfect to become a franchise but also because the film also happens to be really good.