For months Arianne has been talking about this film. If you know her or her taste, you’d know why. Any movie with Lily James or Tessa Thompson is a must-see in her household. So, imagine her reaction when they’re in a film together. And also imagine hearing about it for months on end. In fact, the only reason I’m doing this write-up is that she’s stuck at work and hasn’t even had the opportunity to look at the trailer yet. Sorry friend.

I have to be honest making this list might have been the hardest year for me to choose a top 20. The reason wasn’t because of the lack of films but the other way around. After watching over a 100 new released this year, making this list was something so difficult that I ended up with almost has many honourable mentions then movies on my list.

It’s also important to note that four films would have made it on the list had they have wide released. Those four films are Claire Dennis’ High Life starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche, Max Minghella’s Teen Spirit starring Elle Fanning, Wanuri Kahiu’s Rafiki and finally Anthony Maras’s Hotel Mumbai starring Dev Patel and Armie Hammer. So be on the lookout when they finally come to your theatres because they are totally worth it.

I’ve blinked and the year has already finished, which as we all know means, we need to discuss some of the best films of the year. It never gets easier, year after year it’s a struggle to put a list together. For as long as I can remember, I haven’t been able to narrow it down to 10 films, and this year isn’t any different. So, these are my twenty favourite films of the year. There are many I didn’t get around to watching, and I will be rectifying that in the near future, but for the time being, these are the films I think helped define this year, and the ones I’ll be recommending for the foreseeable future.

The first eighteen films will be in alphabetical order, except for the last two that are tied.

I have been tasked with the tough decision of making my Top Ten Favourite Films of the year. This is never an easy venture. As a self proclaimed film buff/cinephile I find I constantly fall in love with films and my lists just keeps piling up as the year goes on. I’m also that kind of person who if you ask about my favourite movie, food, ice cream place I will give you a top 3-20 list because I can never choose just one.

I feel like I saw a lot of films this year but comparing my list to others I may have missed a lot of the buzzworthy films because they didn’t make my list. I also still have so much to catch up on regarding films that came out in 2018. I apologize in advance as my list will definitely not match others but I’m confident in saying these titles shouldn’t be looked over either.

I still remember when it was announced that Jodie Whittaker was going to be taking over for Peter Capaldi as the new face of Doctor Who. A day of celebration for many, haters were naturally drawn to the sounds of joy and started flooding the Internet with comments about how a female doctor would ruin the show. White, male nerds do not take well to change. Thankfully, the overwhelming support for a female doctor made those comments seem like nothing more than a small, obstinate few. When the show premiered and Whittaker’s performance met with overwhelming approval, those comments were nearly forgotten. Nearly.

A few years back, Cate Blanchett won an Oscar for her role in BlueJasmine​, and during her acceptance speech, she touched on something that Hollywood had yet to catch on to: “[They think] female films, with women at the centre, are niche experiences – they are not, audiences want to see them, and in fact, they earn money.” She said it in 2014, but they’re just barely catching on.

If you take a look at the films coming out of the major studios, there’s a tendency towards casting known White actors. It seems as if Hollywood believes that by doing so they will attract more viewers. Fans of Wes Anderson are aware that isn’t always the case.  When we focus on a specific group of people, like some examples we will be looking at momentarily, we’ll see how they aren’t minimizing the amount of viewers.

Hi! We’re new, so we’d like to introduce ourselves.

We are the underSCENE. Primarily based out of Toronto, we are a collection of writers who want to be a step towards the change we need. But first and foremost, we’re a bunch of film geeks, and so we’re gonna frame these ideas for the big screen. And that means looking at the film industry and its mess. Before we get into all of that (Trust me, we will.) we’re here to talk about being visible on screen. For those of us non-cis, non-white folk, we don’t often see ourselves in the movies or on T.V. Rarely in a positive way. We’re never the hero of the story, but the sidekick, the villain, or dead before the end. It’s exhausting and demoralizing. Sure, representation for minorities is getting better, but for every Black Panther or Crazy Rich Asians, we have thousands of films starring Scarlett Johansson as an Asian person. The corporate media chooses not to properly cover these films, so we’ll do it instead.