I will be honest, yes I have watched most of the James Bond movies but I never was a true fan. I liked the films but the sexism and misogyny of it all always rubbed me the wrong way. Hell, one of my final essay in University was about just that. But never the less, I was always planning to keep going with the series, because they actually happened to be good. I enjoyed the action and Daniel Craig was a good Bond, he wasn’t your typical Bond but he still was entertaining.

Frankly, I have no idea where this review is going to go until I just dive right in, which to be fair, is exactly how everyone should go into Midsommar.

I can not be alone, but Ari Aster made a hell of a name for themselves last year with Hereditary. I gladly caught it in the theatres three times and have been anxiously anticipating for Midsommar (or a follow-up in general) ever since. He has a clear voice about these bonds that are astonishing to witness.

Sometimes a movie has a better premise then the final product. I went in for Yesterday, I had expectations. Not only was this a script from Richard Curtis but it was a Danny Boyle film. It was tailor-made for me. And yet, when everything was done, I couldn’t help but feel like something was missing. Yesterday isn’t a bad movie, it’s actually pretty good but with that premise and team, I was expecting to be blown away. And that just didn’t happen.

I know, reboots are never great. And in an era where they seem to be everywhere, it’s hard to be excited for them. But sometimes, one sneaks up on you and you just can’t wait for it. I still have fond memories of the Drew Barrymore, Lucy Liu and Cameron Diaz film of the 2000s but I just can’t help to be excited by this one. And the trailer might have been a generic action trailer but it still managed to get me excited.

If you know me, you know that this article was coming. In fact, you all should be surprised it wasn’t already posted by the time this one will be.

Before we even talk about the trailer, let me educate the uninformed. Mike Flanagan is one of my favourite working filmmakers. He understands horror at a core level – and then allows you to empathize with his characters through proper drama. Why do horror films work better than others? Simple, because you care about the characters. The villain or our heroes. In some slasher series (take a stab at any really), by the end of their franchises, it becomes less and less about an on-going hero (with some exceptions), and more and more about a hero. We don’t go to see any Friday The 13th films except to see Jason kill some teenagers. We do go see any of the Scream films, or the recent sequel to 1978’s HalloweenHalloween. I know, names for movies are strange. But that’s what works best with Flanagan. You care about his characters.

Sometimes comedies just hit the right spot. Some comedies are just tailor-made for you, while others not so much. Late Night is not only in my wheelhouse when it comes to humour but it just hits a home run when it comes to its subject and message. Filmed in 2017, Late Night is as timely as ever and maybe even more in the post #MeToo era that we live in. And yet, while it hammers down on its feminist message and diversity message, it’s never too much. It always does it just right.

With every year, there are always a handful of films that I try and champion. Films with little-to-no marketing. This is why I almost have a film end on my list of favourites at the end of the year that nobody has heard of before.

Knives and Skin is definitely one of those movies you’ll hear me rave about for the rest of the year. If you followed any outlets that have been at Tribeca, Overlook or even Fantasia later this year, I know you’re going to hear all about this film. And you very much should. You’re going to hear a lot of similarities to Twins Peaks – and rightfully so.

When I first heard about Adam I wasn’t so sure. It’s a controversial subject. A young man pretends to be trans so he can get a lesbian to fall in love with him. It’s a tricky subject that if handled by the wrong person, it could have been a real disaster. While some aspects of it didn’t sit with me well, it also didn’t do a mockery of everything. And that is a lot due to the fact that the film was directed by Rhys Ernst (Transparent) who himself is a trans man. Had the film been directed by a CIS person, the point of view would have been totally different. Ernst brings a vision and a truth that no one else but him could bring.