Picking what to watch at a festival is tough. Sometimes half the battle isn’t just picking the films, it’s also the flow of it all. Which includes how to start and end it. The first and obvious choice was the one they chose to open the festival with, but the scheduling didn’t work out for me. Thankfully Arianne got to catch it. But then I read the premise for Bit, and I was hooked. Bit is a female-centric vampire flick that was geared to tackle gender norms. The poster is a beaut (as you can see below) and comes with a killer tagline. I was very excited and amped, and very quickly it turned into a bit of a disappointment.

Don’t get me wrong, although I was never a loud doubting voice, I did have my doubts about this adaptation. Such as why? I’ve enjoyed some of the other remakes (Pete’s Dragon and Cinderella are stand-outs for me) but the question needs to be asked, do we need it? The answer is a fairly obvious “of course not”, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun with it.

In 2013, Dexter Fletcher was announced as the director of Bohemian Rhapsody. He would go on to leave the project for creative differences in the same year. But then when the director of the film was fired following a series of events, Fletcher came back to finish the product and deliver the best product he could with what he was working with. I truly believe that the experience of Bohemian influenced greatly what Rocketman is. Because Rocketman is everything that Bohemian wanted to be.

Movies are an escape. They are a way for us to spend a few hours to forget our lives. It can make us happy, sad and even, sometimes, angry. But to me, the best movies are also the one that when you walk out you can relate to them on another level. Those times that when you leave the theatre you can’t help but self reflect and find out why you connected to it so much.

It was almost the end of TIFF and it was definitely getting to me. I wasn’t sleeping that much, and I was still trying to work at the same time. I made it to the last two days of the festival, and I had at least 4 films left. It ended up being 5 because I grabbed a ticket to the People’s Choice Award winner. On Saturday, I had 3 movies to see and this was the last one of the day, and it started at 9:45. I was a bit amped due to Arianne’s glowing review as she caught it the week prior, but it was also a semi-late film and I was just hoping for something to keep me awake. If it were up to me, I would have walked back in to see it again after the film ended.

Some of us saw this coming, the review is finally here.

I try to see as many films by A24 as possible for many reasons. One, being they have a great track record of putting out some of my favourite films for the last three years, First Reformed, Good Time, and Moonlight. But also similarly to Blumhouse, something A24 seemingly does is that they try and push the director’s vision. They allow for that opportunity, and they lean into the bizarre. Some of the films that were released in their first year were James Ponsoldt’s The Spectacular Now, but also released Harmony Korine’s epic Spring Breakers.

The first season of Killing Eve was one of the most entertaining television show of 2018, making its way to my first spot in my final list of television series of 2018. So to say that I was anticipating its return is just an understatement. I don’t think I have been this excited and scared for the return of a show. Because I loved the first season so much, I was just scared that it wouldn’t live up to what I had come to expect from this brilliant show. Not only that but Phoebe Waller-Bridge (Fleabag), the showrunner for the first season, had left her post as the lead writer to go make the second season of her brilliant series Fleabag. Instead, Emerald Fennell (Call The Midwife) took the reign of the show.

Sometimes a movie just hits it out of the park. And for the DCEU it’s a much needed welcome. With Shazam, they find their near perfect movie. From the opening teaser to one of the best third act in a superhero movie, Shazam is just plain fun. This movie is everything Aquaman wanted to be but failed just a little short of being. And that is not to say that Aquaman isn’t good, it just means that Shazam is better. Yes, some of the CGI could have used a week or two so that it could have been perfect, but I am ready to excuse it just for how plain fun this film was. From the opening teaser, you are sucked in. Strong direction, writing and acting makes for one of those movies that, in a world where superhero movies are everywhere, just bring a breath of fresh air.

I still remember what it was like when I saw Get Out for the first time. I felt how the world was going to shift in its own ways as I shifted in my seat slowly throughout the run time. One thing was for sure, Jordan Peele wasn’t just a comedic genius, he was just a genius. And then we saw him win an Oscar and life was good.

From it’s opening to the end, there’s something very 90’s about Greta. It’s a feeling that never quite goes away and gives the film a little thing that feels a bit out of place in today’s world. That doesn’t mean that Greta is a bad film, hell, I found it really enjoyable even with its faults. It just makes the movie a little thing that seems to have come out a little late. Thrillers like this were the norm back in the ’90s. Today, well, not so much. Yes, we still see thrillers happen today, but they never get the same attention that they had before. Most of them fade really quickly or are not considered great cinema. And very rarely do they get two great actresses like Chloë Grace Moretz and Isabelle Huppert as their leads.