Movies make you feel things. Those feelings can vary from films to films but they are supposed to be there. Walking away from a film feeling nothing is never something that should happen. And then there are the movies that make you feel everything, overwhelms your sensations and make you question everything you think you know For me, Portrait of a Lady on Fire did just that. It’s not that it’s emotional per se, it’s more of a feeling that the movie gives you. While there is some moment that will bring you to tears, the atmosphere and story itself make you feel. Films that are able to set feelings without really trying are unique, they are in a category of their own, at least for me. I hate to compare films, I think it doesn’t do justice to them really. But if I had to compare Portrait of a Lady on Fire to another one, in terms of the way emotions, or at least what it made me feel, I would compare it to Call Me By Your Name. Let me tell you why.

Parasite cons you just like it’s protagonists con the family they infiltrate the life of. Bong Joon-oh makes you believe one thing and then lets the curtain fall, it’s then that you realize that you are faced with a totally different film. What Bong Joon-oh does so well is to create a feeling of comfort in you, you think you know where it’s all going and then… Goodbye comfort and hello madness. It’s wild, unpredictable but oh so delightful. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what type of film Parasite is. Not because it’s nothing but because it’s everything. At times comedy, followed by thriller to end with drama, Parasite blends genre like nothing else before.

Commentary films are somewhat of a norm nowadays. In the world we are currently living in, they are impossible to escape. But rare are those films that go in a different direction to look at our situation. Most of them are brutally honest and raw, making your emotions run wild. And Antigone does that but in a different way. It’s brutally honest and raw but decides to look also at the past to explore our present. By adapting the Greek tragedy of the same name, Sophie Deraspe (The Amina Profile, Missing Victor Pellerin) finds a way to do a commentary on today’s world while looking at the past of it all. It’s interesting and sad that such an old tale still works but Deraspe is capable of hammering down her point by changing just a few things to make it fit today’s world.

Last week, TIFF announced their first waves of film and we were right here to tell you all about them. And again today, TIFF continued their announcements for this year’s festival by announcing their Canadian slate to the programming. This programming features newcomers, alumni and is more diverse than ever. Let’s first look at everything that was announced and then let’s take a deep dive into what TIFF has in store for us.

This is what some of us have been waiting for over almost a year. Pretty much since the last festival has ended. As soon as it ended, we all took a day break and then collectively went “until next time.” So here are the first wave announcements and after the press release portion of the post, I’m gonna break down why some of these are so exciting – but also, what I want to see and not as intrigued about.