It was almost the end of TIFF and it was definitely getting to me. I wasn’t sleeping that much, and I was still trying to work at the same time. I made it to the last two days of the festival, and I had at least 4 films left. It ended up being 5 because I grabbed a ticket to the People’s Choice Award winner. On Saturday, I had 3 movies to see and this was the last one of the day, and it started at 9:45. I was a bit amped due to Arianne’s glowing review as she caught it the week prior, but it was also a semi-late film and I was just hoping for something to keep me awake. If it were up to me, I would have walked back in to see it again after the film ended.

Some of us saw this coming, the review is finally here.

I try to see as many films by A24 as possible for many reasons. One, being they have a great track record of putting out some of my favourite films for the last three years, First Reformed, Good Time, and Moonlight. But also similarly to Blumhouse, something A24 seemingly does is that they try and push the director’s vision. They allow for that opportunity, and they lean into the bizarre. Some of the films that were released in their first year were James Ponsoldt’s The Spectacular Now, but also released Harmony Korine’s epic Spring Breakers.

I still remember what it was like when I saw Get Out for the first time. I felt how the world was going to shift in its own ways as I shifted in my seat slowly throughout the run time. One thing was for sure, Jordan Peele wasn’t just a comedic genius, he was just a genius. And then we saw him win an Oscar and life was good.

It’s been five years since Robert Rodriguez has put out a feature film (Sin City: A Dame to Kill For) but it’s been a bit longer since he had a hit. His films have always been an interesting mixture of genres. He loves the campiness of “B films” (hence his Grindhouse film) and always adds to it which makes the film seem “cringey” but I always believed it was on purpose. On top of that, he has affixation to digital cinema. In the wonderful documentary Side by Side (a documentary regarding shooting on film versus digital) he speaks about how when George Lucas said that digital was the future, he figured why would he argue with a legend in the film making world.

High Flying Bird is the latest film by one of the hardest working filmmakers, Steven Soderbergh. Following his last experiment Unsane (which was great), he once again made a movie after shooting it on an iPhone 7. While most people freaked out, the fact is the camera is the only thing the phone was used for, not for audio. Also, professional lighting was also used. He’s always been at the forefront of digital cinema. He made Unsane and High Flying Bird as a statement that anybody could make a film, using our own phones is the easiest way to get there.