From it’s opening to the end, there’s something very 90’s about Greta. It’s a feeling that never quite goes away and gives the film a little thing that feels a bit out of place in today’s world. That doesn’t mean that Greta is a bad film, hell, I found it really enjoyable even with its faults. It just makes the movie a little thing that seems to have come out a little late. Thrillers like this were the norm back in the ’90s. Today, well, not so much. Yes, we still see thrillers happen today, but they never get the same attention that they had before. Most of them fade really quickly or are not considered great cinema. And very rarely do they get two great actresses like Chloë Grace Moretz and Isabelle Huppert as their leads.

It’s been five years since Robert Rodriguez has put out a feature film (Sin City: A Dame to Kill For) but it’s been a bit longer since he had a hit. His films have always been an interesting mixture of genres. He loves the campiness of “B films” (hence his Grindhouse film) and always adds to it which makes the film seem “cringey” but I always believed it was on purpose. On top of that, he has affixation to digital cinema. In the wonderful documentary Side by Side (a documentary regarding shooting on film versus digital) he speaks about how when George Lucas said that digital was the future, he figured why would he argue with a legend in the film making world.

High Flying Bird is the latest film by one of the hardest working filmmakers, Steven Soderbergh. Following his last experiment Unsane (which was great), he once again made a movie after shooting it on an iPhone 7. While most people freaked out, the fact is the camera is the only thing the phone was used for, not for audio. Also, professional lighting was also used. He’s always been at the forefront of digital cinema. He made Unsane and High Flying Bird as a statement that anybody could make a film, using our own phones is the easiest way to get there.